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Author Topic: Metal detectorist unearths stunning £15,000 gold hat pin from 1485  (Read 646 times)
Neil
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« on: April 12, 2019, 08:45:38 AM »


By VICTORIA BELL

12 April 2019

 
An amateur metal detectorist has unearthed a gold hat pin worth £15,000 that may have belonged to King Edward IV, who reigned during the 15th century.

Lisa Grace, 42, spotted the Medieval jewel, which is in pristine condition, while searching a recently-ploughed field in Lincolnshire.

It is believed the pin is linked to royalty as Edward IV and his circle wore strikingly similar pieces during his two reigns as King from 1460 until his death in 1483.

Experts believe that the jewel was made in the late 15th century and is designed as a sun in splendour - the personal emblem of Edward IV.

They believe that the piece may have been lost in battle. His first reign was filled with power struggle and conflicts, with many taking place in the area.


At the centre of the piece is a purple amethyst stone, another of the King's favourites, leading some specialists to speculate that it may have been lost by Edward IV himself.

The pin closely resembles a very similar jewel depicted on Edward IV's hat in a portrait preserved in The Museum Calvet in Avignon, France.

Ms Grace said she was stunned when she found it a few inches below the ground.

'When I found it the jewel wasn't far under the ground at all as the field had recently been ploughed,' she said.

It is believed the pin is linked to royalty as Edward IV and his circle wore strikingly similar pieces in the 15th century   +6
Lisa Grace, left, spotted the pristine jewel in a recently-ploughed field in Lincolnshire, Right, Edward IV and his circle wore strikingly similar pieces in the 15th century

The jewel is thought to have been made around the year 1485 and is designed as a sun in splendour - the personal emblem of Edward IV. At the centre of the piece is a purple amethyst stone, another of the King's favourites, leading some specialists to speculate that it may have been lost by Edward IV himself   


HOW DO METAL DETECTORS WORK? 
The invention of the metal detector cannot be truly claimed by one person.

It is a combination and amalgamation of several different pieces of technology.

Alexander Graham Bell did fashion a device that was an electromagnetic, metal locating machine.

This was based on a device invented by physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Dove.

Sometime later, an engineer Gerhard Fischer, filed a patent regarding a design.

A metal detector consists of a stabiliser, control box, shaft, and search coil.

It is the two coils that are actually responsible for the detection of metal.

The outer coil is the transmitter coil while the inner coil is the receiver coil.

This works to detect and amplify frequencies. This type of technology is known as Very Low Frequency or VLF technology.

When electricity is provided to this transmitter coil, there is a magnetic field created around the coil.

This is the same science behind electromagnets. 

When the machine wafts over metal the electrons in the metal - due to its metallic bonding and sea of electrons surrounding a fixed positively charged mass -  are affected by the magnetic field.

The change in the electrons triggers a tiny electrical field in the metal object which alters the frequency of the metal detector.

This indicates  metal is present. 

More advanced metal detectors are also able of differentiating between different types of metal ad the frequency change is different and therefore the pitch of the note is altered.




The specialists say they have been experiencing early interest from both collectors and museums and are expecting offers between £10,000 and £15,000.

Mr Schwinge from Duke's, said: 'The jewel does bear a striking resemblance to the one in a well-known portrait of Edward IV from the Musee Calvet.

He also said that it also could have belonged to a courtier.

'The fact is we shall never know but it clearly belonged to someone of high status in the upper echelons of medieval society.'

Ms Grace said: 'To be honest my initial reaction was one of ''what the hell is this?'' - I didn't have any idea.

'It was only later when I phoned some friends and did some research that I found out how special it was.



'The possibility that it could have belonged to royalty is amazing and even if it didn't, it would have belonged to someone of high status.'

Ms Grace has now listed the pin for sale and it is to go under the hammer at Duke's Auctioneers of Dorchester, Dorset.

The jewel, which remains in stunning condition, will be sold at the auction house on April 26.


* 12138752-6911185-image-m-31_1554977262563.jpg (100.2 KB, 634x589 - viewed 379 times.)

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* 12138768-6911185-The_jewel_is_thought_to_have_been_made_around_the_year_1485_and_-m-9_1554981887577.jpg (57.17 KB, 634x435 - viewed 386 times.)

* 12138774-6911185-image-m-16_1554977105184.jpg (43.31 KB, 306x398 - viewed 437 times.)
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There comes a time in every rightly constructed boys life when he has a raging urge to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure.

Mark Twain 1835 - 1910

If anyone wants to sell any S c r a p gold or sovereigns, regardless of condition -  ask me for a price first please.
N8
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2019, 06:58:42 PM »

Thanks for sharing Neil, its amazing whats buried in the ground beneath our feet
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To dig or not to dig? That is the question
anthonyjay
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2019, 07:30:00 PM »

Well done to the youngster, a beautiful find AJ
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Dungbeetle
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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2019, 01:29:52 PM »

That's  a great  find and I  don't  want  to rain  on the finders parade but surely  it's  a treasure  item and shouldn't  be for sale  unless it's  been  disclaimed which  doesn't  seem  likely  ?
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probono
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2019, 01:49:40 PM »

Fantastic find - mind you she's also using a fearsome bit of detecting kit too Smiley
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Val Beechey
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2019, 04:56:28 PM »

Must admit to thinking the same as dung beetle. Seems a bit premature as well if the dates are correct. Article dated April 2019 states the finder was searching recently !  Curious ?

Itís a very beautiful thing, thatís for sure. I wondered if the might have been other bits on the bottom of the chains. Looks likely to me and the painting of Edward, in the article depicts some. The idea of it being lost in a battle seems a bit far out. Just proves what wired imaginations some people have.

The article does give info on the Auction house and the date of sale so if anyoneís really interested, I sípose it could be watched. Would be interesting.
Agree about the fearsome bit of kit. I wouldnít like to swing that around. She must have some good shoulders  Shocked

Thanks for posting Neil 👍
« Last Edit: April 13, 2019, 04:58:57 PM by Val Beechey » Logged

Ever Optimistic, it's out there somewhere - And I Found it
jtalbot0001
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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2019, 09:21:42 PM »

I tracked down this item, it was found in 2013!! DENO-65C775

I also see that the item is not stated to be a hat pin by PAS as mentioned in the article? That is why I could not track it on PAS, Pas refers to it as: A gold medieval pendant roundel!

I also see that the item is not listed as DISCLAIMED? An error and never updated??

Interesting.
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THE TALBOT MOTTO: "To sniff out all things old and beautiful." ....... Just because I'm extinct doesn't mean I can't sniff out the hammereds!
Val Beechey
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2019, 09:44:19 AM »

My first thought, before reading the article was, Pendant. Then I thought, well maybe it was secured with a pin through the loop.
Not the first time news reports have got everything wrong though. Makes you wonder if the reporters are hard of hearing or just plain inefficient.

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Ever Optimistic, it's out there somewhere - And I Found it

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