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Author Topic: Diary of finding a hoard  (Read 9064 times)
Tafflaff (Rob)
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« Reply #15 on: May 20, 2012, 07:17:43 PM »

I think it would be wise here, - And I'm sure Avalon would agree, that not all F.L.O's work the same. I know Geoff uses Laura the Somerset F.L.O and she works tirelessly,  My dealings with Mark Lodwick have all been a good experience as well as Peter Reaville (top bloke IMO).
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There is only so many times one can turn the other cheek.
avalon
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« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2012, 08:09:13 PM »

It would nice to think any Archaeologist viewing this post as a guest , will realise to build trust it has to work both ways, otherwise that great divide will just get wider.
They  also need to put their own house in order, rather than  cause distrust amongst those that do record.
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nfl
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« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2012, 08:17:50 PM »

well said steve,and as a archi undergrad i can safely say i can see both sides of the fence Cheesy,,,if im qualified when you find your next hoard give me a bell  Wink Grin
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2012 finds
29 hammys
24 other silver coins pre 1947
2 silver thimbles,,,,2 parts gold medi ring
half noble coin weight
3 silver roman
celtic broach
celtic terret ring
b/a  axe head
1 pilgrims ampulla {1350-1450}
12thc personnel lead seal matrix
2 parts fibula 1 complete
14thc ring broac
Chef Geoff
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« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2012, 08:19:46 PM »

As Taff has said I have had a great relationship not only with Laura and her predecessor Anna as FLO's but also the county Archaeologist.
It saddens me when I hear of the trouble that some people have but as in all professions and walks of life, sometimes things go pear shaped. Undecided
« Last Edit: May 20, 2012, 08:40:56 PM by Chef Geoff » Logged
avalon
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« Reply #19 on: May 20, 2012, 09:02:55 PM »

It would be interesting to find out whether out of the 1800 pieces of gold found in the Staffordshire hoard, were the damaged and cut up pieces of gold, valued at just 3 times scrape value, or do they move the goal posts to suit themselves.  Huh
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nfl
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« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2012, 09:10:35 PM »

i just think they blindfold themselves and stick pins in a numbers chart Grin
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2012 finds
29 hammys
24 other silver coins pre 1947
2 silver thimbles,,,,2 parts gold medi ring
half noble coin weight
3 silver roman
celtic broach
celtic terret ring
b/a  axe head
1 pilgrims ampulla {1350-1450}
12thc personnel lead seal matrix
2 parts fibula 1 complete
14thc ring broac
Chef Geoff
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« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2012, 09:10:54 PM »

Yes I believe from the award breakdown I read, the scrap gold was only priced as such and so it should be. Gold is as old as the earth and is not made by someone only shaped. Therefore if it has been cut into unidentifiable pieces how do you value it above a new wedding ring?
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nfl
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« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2012, 09:17:00 PM »

some of you may remember that last year i found 2 seperate pieces {in the same spot}of a 15thc gold ring{crosses on it,clasped hands etc} i filled out treasure forms for said pieces ,,earlier this year i found 2 more pieces of said ring{same place} only to be told the first pieces were disclaimed even though they had photographs of which i sent of the 2 latter pieces ,,yey i still had to fill out treasure form for second set ,,,,what a waste of time ,,,,beurocracy gone MAD.
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2012 finds
29 hammys
24 other silver coins pre 1947
2 silver thimbles,,,,2 parts gold medi ring
half noble coin weight
3 silver roman
celtic broach
celtic terret ring
b/a  axe head
1 pilgrims ampulla {1350-1450}
12thc personnel lead seal matrix
2 parts fibula 1 complete
14thc ring broac
avalon
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« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2012, 09:24:37 PM »

Yes I believe from the award breakdown I read, the scrap gold was only priced as such and so it should be. Gold is as old as the earth and is not made by someone only shaped. Therefore if it has been cut into unidentifiable pieces how do you value it above a new wedding ring?

That would then mean any precious metal objects we detect over 300 years old that are just fragments, should not be deemed treasure, so should not be handed in under the Treasure Act. Any object of gold or silver which has been fashioned in some way, other than itís crude form is and important object because of what it can tell us, not consigned to the scrap bucket.
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nfl
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« Reply #24 on: May 20, 2012, 09:28:20 PM »

when i found a tudor silver bodkin which was disclaimed i gave it the farmer ,,,next time i find  ???treasure Huh,,my finds box is going to be treasuring it  Grin
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2012 finds
29 hammys
24 other silver coins pre 1947
2 silver thimbles,,,,2 parts gold medi ring
half noble coin weight
3 silver roman
celtic broach
celtic terret ring
b/a  axe head
1 pilgrims ampulla {1350-1450}
12thc personnel lead seal matrix
2 parts fibula 1 complete
14thc ring broac
Chef Geoff
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« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2012, 09:52:18 PM »

Yes I believe from the award breakdown I read, the scrap gold was only priced as such and so it should be. Gold is as old as the earth and is not made by someone only shaped. Therefore if it has been cut into unidentifiable pieces how do you value it above a new wedding ring?

That would then mean any precious metal objects we detect over 300 years old that are just fragments, should not be deemed treasure, so should not be handed in under the Treasure Act. Any object of gold or silver which has been fashioned in some way, other than itís crude form is and important object because of what it can tell us, not consigned to the scrap bucket.

Well there is some weight to that argument but how would you then value it by; age of scrap? pretty scrap? scrap without scratches? You have to draw a line somewhere and just because it was yours doesn't make it more valuable.
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avalon
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« Reply #26 on: May 20, 2012, 10:41:20 PM »

A £20 note is just a scrap of paper with ink on it, but it is worth more than just a scrap of paper. Smiley
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Chef Geoff
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« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2012, 11:02:05 PM »

Ahhh but it's what that ink has written that's important.
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avalon
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« Reply #28 on: May 21, 2012, 06:11:21 AM »

The ink is just a written promise to pay the bearer the value of the note, where gold is a tangible asset  when currency falls back on hard times. The gold you see now will always be with us, the notes may last 6 months if your lucky.
The value off the Bronze Age hoard is in the history it represents and what it tells us about ourselves, not in the actual  bullion weight. If it was proved to be Welsh gold it would be worth 6 times the price of South African gold.
What price should be put on art?
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Chef Geoff
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« Reply #29 on: May 21, 2012, 08:20:44 AM »

The ink is just a written promise to pay the bearer the value of the note, where gold is a tangible asset  when currency falls back on hard times. The gold you see now will always be with us, the notes may last 6 months if your lucky.
The value off the Bronze Age hoard is in the history it represents and what it tells us about ourselves, not in the actual  bullion weight. If it was proved to be Welsh gold it would be worth 6 times the price of South African gold.
What price should be put on art?


Exactly, it's academic value is priceless but how do you you put a price on it? Your getting on morally dodgy ground when you start charging for it.
Much of the bronze age gold comes from Ireland but even if Welsh, it's price would only be high if you intended melting it down and making jewellery out of it.
Sorry Steve I'm playing Devils advocate here slightly but their has to be a system of pricing however unfair it may seam. If you were to find a fragment of a Double Leopard, it's price would be negligible in comparison to the whole coin and it's the same with Bronze age gold, an unidentifiable piece of gold is just that.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 04:13:25 PM by Chef Geoff » Logged

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